International Symposium on Software Composition

Industrial technology

Industrial technology is the use of engineering and manufacturing technology to make production faster, simpler and more efficient.The industrial technology field employs creative and technically proficient individuals who can help a company achieve efficient and profitable productivity.

Industrial Technology programs typically include instruction in optimization theory, human factors, organizational behavior, industrial processes, industrial planning procedures, computer applications, and report and presentation preparation.

The USA based Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE), accredits selected collegiate programs in Industrial Technology in the USA. An instructor or graduate of an Industrial Technology program may choose to become a Certified Technology Manager (CTM) by sitting for a rigorous exam administered by ATMAE covering Production Planning & Control, Safety, Quality, and Management/Supervision.

ATMAE program accreditation is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) for accrediting Industrial Technology programs. CHEA recognizes ATMAE in the U.S. for accrediting associate, baccalaureate, and master's degree programs in technology, applied technology, engineering technology, and technology-related disciplines delivered by national or regional accredited institutions in the United States.(2011).

"A career in industrial technology typically entails formal education from an accredited college or university. Opportunities are available to professionals with all levels of education. Those who hold associate degrees typically qualify for entry-level technician and technologist positions, such as in the maintenance and operation of machinery. Bachelor's degree-holders could fill management and engineering positions, such as plant manager, production supervisor and quality systems engineering technologist. A graduate degree in industrial technology could qualify individuals for jobs in research, teaching and upper-level management".

Industrial Technology includes wide-ranging subject matter and could be viewed as an amalgamation of industrial engineering and business topics with a focus on practicality and management of technical systems with less focus on actual engineering of those systems.

Typical curriculum at a four-year university might include courses on manufacturing process, technology and impact on society, mechanical and electronic systems, quality assurance and control, materials science, packaging, production and operations management, and manufacturing facility planning and design. In addition, the Industrial Technologist may have exposure to more vocational-style education in the form of courses on CNC manufacturing, welding, and other tools-of-the-trade in manufacturing.

Industrial technology program graduates obtain a majority of positions which are applied engineering and/or management oriented. Since "industrial technologist" is not a common job title in the United States, the actual bachelor's degree or associate degree earned by the individual is obscured by the job title he/she receives. Typical job titles for industrial technologists having a bachelor's degree include quality systems engineering technologist, manufacturing engineering technologist, industrial engineering technologist, plant manager, production supervisor, etc. Typical job titles for industrial technologists having a two-year associate degree include project technologist, manufacturing technologist, process technologist, etc.

Studies in this area often employ a multi-disciplinary research methodology and shade off into the wider analysis of business and economic growth (development, performance). The studies are often based on a mixture of industrial field research and desk-based data analysis and aim to be of interest and use to practitioners in business management and investment (etc.) as well as academics. In engineering, construction, textiles, food and drugs, chemicals and petroleum, and other industries, the focus has been on not only the nature and factors facilitating and hampering the introduction and utilization of new technologies but also the impact of new technologies on the production organization (etc.) of firms and various social and other wider aspects of the technological development process.